Friday, October 31, 2014

FIX RATHER THAN CONDEMN

The New York Times, whaa??? The New York Times chipped in on Proposition 47 with some good sense. I hope as voters you'll remember to vote for something that can help rather than hinder law enforcement. This measure is supported by SOME veteran law enforcement professionals, though the greater number of them oppose it.

A number of major California newspapers that have endorsed a Yes vote on Prop 47. Then, this morning, something unexpected happened.
The New York Times editorial board, which rarely weighs in on California ballot initiatives, added its voice to the chorus urging California voters to pass this common sense reform. Our reform movement is catching fire across California and across the country. Prop 47 could be on track to become a model for other states.
Read the full editorial below, then forward this email to everyone you know in California.

Editorial: California Leads on Justice Reform

Prop 47 Could Take the State a Step Further in Reducing Overcrowding
For a long time, the conventional political wisdom was that no one ever lost an election for being too tough on crime. That wisdom has been turned on its head in recent years, as both politicians and the public are realizing how much damage the lock-’em-up mind-set has caused.
In recent polls asking about the most important problems facing the country, crime ranks way at the bottom. That’s because crime is at its lowest levels in decades, even while overstuffed prisons cripple state budgets.
A familiar retort is that crime is down precisely because the prisons are full, but that’s simply not true. Multiple studies show that crime has gone down faster in states that have reduced their prison populations.
An encouraging example comes from California, the site of some the worst excesses of the mass incarceration era, but also some of the more innovative responses to it.
For five years, the state has been under federal court order to reduce extreme overcrowding in its prisons. In response, voters in 2012 overwhelmingly approved a ballot measure to scale back the state’s notorious “three-strikes” law, leading to the release, so far, of more than 1,900 prisoners who had been serving life in prison — in some cases, for petty theft.
Dire warnings that crime would go up as a result were unfounded. Over two years, the recidivism rate of former three-strikes inmates is 3.4 percent, or less than one-tenth of the state’s average. That’s, in large part, because of a strong network of re-entry services.

The 2012 measure has provided the model for an even bigger proposed release of prisoners that California voters will consider on the ballot next week. Under Proposition 47, many low-level drug and property offenses — like shoplifting, writing bad checks or simple drug possession — would be converted from felonies to misdemeanors.
That would cut an average of about a year off the sentences of up to 10,000 inmates, potentially saving the state hundreds of millions of dollars annually. To keep people from returning to prison, or from going in the first place, the savings would be invested in anti-truancy efforts and other programs like mental health and drug-abuse treatment. Some would go to victims’ services, a perennially underfinanced part of the justice system.
Law-enforcement officials, not surprisingly, oppose the measure, warning that crime will go up. But they’ve already been proved wrong on three-strikes reform.
Californians — who support the proposition by a healthy margin, according to polls — have now seen for themselves that they don’t have to choose between reducing prison populations and protecting public safety.
It is very rare for lawmakers anywhere to approve legislation to shorten sentences for people already in prison; it is virtually unheard-of to do it by ballot measure. California’s continuing experiment on sentencing can be a valuable lesson to states around the country looking for smart and safe ways to unravel America’s four-decade incarceration binge.

Think!  Then vote.  Hooray for Californians, leaders across the nation.

1 comment:

Blogger said...

Earn free satoshis over at CLAIM BTC Faucet. Up to 57 satoshis every 20 minutes.